Hang Moose Meat

Is there any reason not to hang moose meat, in a proper cooler,for 14-21 days...before processing??


I have heard different opinions... what's yours..

Tks Rod



Thanks for the question Rod.

No, there is absolutely no reason not to hang moose meat to age it.

Like you, I have heard others say it is not necessary to hang moose meat.

I do not know why people are against this practice. Consider beef, always hung and aged... Why? To tenderize and let the meat start to break down. Most of these animals spend their final days in feed lots, milling about, getting no exercise and not building muscle.

Moose on the other hand spend their entire lives staying as fit as they can in order to avoid predators.

Compare the two hanging in a meat locker. Beef, loaded with fat not much sinew. Moose lean and loaded with ligaments and tough meat.

You tell me which of the two need hanging time more. I think you will agree... hang moose meat to age it.

My Dad who is 86 this year tells me that in his younger days he and most of his hunting buddies would give a lot of their hard earned moose meat away. I asked him "How come?"

"The meat was tough and gamey!" was his reply. He eats moose all the time now, because for the past twenty five years I have hung and aged my moose meat. He says "We never knew about such things as hanging the meat, we shot it, brought it home and put it in the freezer." Another thing he was quick to point out is the fact they did not always worry about cooling the meat right away. Sure they would gut the animal, then hoist it up into a tree by its head. Maybe not getting around to skinning it for a few days.

I think this may explain the gamey flavor he referred too.

To summarize... Hang moose meat for a couple weeks will do it no harm... quite the contrary.

Be sure to cool your meat as soon as you can after harvesting.

Good Luck with your hunting!
~ Mark

Comments for Hang Moose Meat

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Aug 16, 2016
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Hang em
by: Mountain Man

Not sure where hanging from the head got started, my family never did, but we saw lots hung that way in many camps. I believe its unnatural for draining out the blood for any animal. Blood coagulates fast, very hard to hang a big animal up fast, but can be done, I use slick block and tackle. Proper care is essential, if you have the time, most don't and or ability to camp on spot hang em head down over night after careful skinning, let the fat set. Next day split in half and quarter, use the hide to lay quarters on to keep clean and dry if possible. Break em down and put in good meat sacks, can wash and reuse. Back to camp and hang em or to your cabin or house. I've hung em all winter at freezing. From down to table Quality is important. Ive hung deer from 3-10 days easy, and Elk around 4-7 days. Have hung moose up to 20 days whole after skinning and cut up the same day. A quality animal should have quality care. Hang en for better taste and texture I think hanging up side down is ethical for any reason.

Aug 15, 2016
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hang em
by: Mountain Man

A big game animal preferably shot in cold weather before the rut is best. Heart and lung shots don't allow for good bleeding. Beef etc are stunned hung and bled, cutting the jugulars. Not everyone will take a head or neck shot, if so the animal is down and quick action is required to cut the jugulars while the heart is still beating. However the quicker you can get the blood out the better. Very hard in a lot of cases on big animals. 45 degrees or less is perfect. Cold weather shot and hung cold will keep moose fat fine.

Oct 26, 2015
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Hanging moose by the neck or legs question.
by: Mark - The Mooseman

Hmmm, to hang moose by the neck or legs?

Would one way be ethical and the other not?

Traditionally most butchers hang their carcasses by the hind legs. This method facilitates the draining of blood in a natural fashion. Also, for the splitting of the carcass along the spine, once the moose is hung from a meat gambrel, this facilitates the easy sawing.

The ethics question you raise may be harder to answer. In any culture that is Kosher, any killed animal must be hung upside down (by the feet).

Maybe that is why you raised the ethics question? Does someone in your group eat only Kosher?

For the non-kosher, would hanging a moose or deer by the antlers or neck be non-ethical?

I'm not so sure about that. I've seen plenty of hunters hang game (usually deer) by the antlers. Antlers are strong and offer a good tie off point.
So why not?

Personally? We have hung deer by the head for ease of skinning using the golf ball or rock method, although we have yet to try this with moose.

We always hang whole moose by the back legs for the following reasons:

1) Even weight distribution on our game bar.

2) Ease of skinning starting at the hind and working towards the neck. Gravity helps to remove the hide.

3) For the ease of sawing the carcass in half.

We plan to try to use the golf ball or rock method on a moose, but with deer we have only done it while hanging from its head.

We have discussed at length the logistics of using this method while the animal is hanging from it's back legs and we believe it is doable. However, we would like to try it on deer sized game first.

Oct 26, 2015
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hang moose
by: Anonymous

Just wondering if its ethical to hang a moose from its head or the hind legs? -- We had a bit of a controversy in the hunt camp and its not resolved.

Oct 27, 2014
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Meat Rack
by: Mark

We just tie a log that is about 8 or 10 inches diameter between two trees. If you have enough space a lot of this size will support two moose.

Oct 19, 2014
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Moose / Deer hanging rack
by: Northern John

Hello All,

Learning about hanging meat, very informative.
Now, What kind of rack would you be using, can you build one or is it easier to purchase one?

Will be watching.

Thanks

John

Sep 30, 2013
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Hanging Moose meat
by: Jonathan DeGrace

I also have hung moose anywhere from 24 hrs to 84 hrs before processing it and have found no difference in the taste or texture. All 4 moose were in the 450 - 550 lb range. All were dressed and skinned promptly and hanging in a meat locker within 8 hrs to 24 hrs. Not sure about the effects of a much larger moose though.

Oct 26, 2011
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Hanging Moose Meat to Age It
by: Mark - Site Owner

Thanks for your comments Fred.

I could not agree more to your statement!

Field care of wild game meat makes the difference in every case for any kind of wild meat. Every hunter should treat his/her wild game meat with the same amount of care beef gets from a butcher.

Oct 26, 2011
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Hanging Moose
by: MooseCaller Fred

Your right on about hanging Moose these days.

Keeping it Clean, Cool, & Properly Gutted are key factors to good tasting meat.

I also run into the controversy either to hang the Moose/Deer head up or down. I prefer the same as the Butcher ...hang it head down.

Sometimes though you you can't hang the animal its desired amount of time so you have to do something with it right away or you might lose it.

Taking proper care of your animal from the field to the table is going to make all the difference in how its going to taste.

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